THE IMPACT AND THE OPPORTUNITIES OF COVID-19 ON HIGHER EDUCATION

Marguerite DennisINFORMATION FOR PRESIDENTS, VICE-CHANCELLORS, CHIEF FINANCIAL
OFFICERS, CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICERS, ENROLLMENT MANAGERS, DEANS OF
ADMISSION, INTERNATIONAL DEANS, REGISTRARS, FINANCIAL AID OFFICERS,
CAREER COUNSELORS, LIFELONG LEARNING COUNSELORS, ALTERNATIVE
EDUCATIONAL PROVIDERS, EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANTS, AND AGENTS

MARGUERITE J. DENNIS

BULLETIN # 29 OCTOBER 19-23, 2020

It is perhaps, the end of the beginning.
United Airlines CEO, Scott Kirby, quoting Winston Churchill

COVID -19 and World Order
In this book, Herbert Wechsler, Director of National Security at Columbia Law
School, wrote: What we do face, is a crisis of change, or more precisely, a crisis of
managing change brought about by a historic shift in the constitutional order of
the State.

I was encouraged to learn of the number of readers of this bulletin who, after
reading last week’s bulletin, ordered COVID-19 and World Order. I believe the
information in this book will help us to better understand what our world,
including our higher education world, will “look like” after the first phase of this
crisis passes. A vaccine will allow us to return to some aspects of our personal and
professional lives, but as the book’s editors report, the vaccine will be unable to
arrest forces that have been unleashed by COVID-19. The vaccine will not be able
to rectify the failure of imagination on the part of higher education chief

executives to reimagine a different world and a different college and university
experience.

Geopolitics
The quadrilateral security dialogue, or Quad, between the United States, Japan,
India, and Australia will be central to the geopolitical landscape in the future. The
alliance is an attempt to move away from a US-led unipolar world to a multipolar
arrangement to resolve issues of common interest.
In the reimagined university, international deans have begun to formulate plans
to hold international conferences and seminars around this security initiative and
international deans and recruiters have begun to formulate plans to recruit
students in each of these countries.
United States – Updates and Information
Reports from the National Student Clearinghouse reveal that throughout the
United States, enrollment of international undergraduates is down 14% and
international graduate school enrollment is down 8%.
The New England Commission of Higher Education reported that more than two
dozen colleges and universities across New England experienced a 20% decrease
in the number of enrolled international students compared to last year.
In the reimagined university plans were already in place to increase international
student enrollments from some combination of creative articulation agreements
and combined degree programs with international schools. Targeted recruitment
outreach plans were already written by an international dean with a deep
understanding of the new world order post COVID-19.
More than two dozen colleges and universities, including Stanford and the
University of Michigan, are suing the federal government to stop the proposed
changes to the H-1B visa for highly skilled workers. The federal government’s
proposal narrows the eligibility for the H-1B visa and increases how much
employers must pay workers hired through the program.
China Update

China’s economy grew 4.9% in the third quarter of this year. It appears that China
is the first major economy to have recovered from COVID-19. National
consumption and international trade were listed as the chief reasons for China’s
third quarter economic growth. But as Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasian
Group, writes in last week’s Time magazine, economic growth in China may have
come at the same time as China’s standing in the world has been tarnished by its
clumsy cover-up of the virus in Wuhan.
Four, out of five, Chinese parents who planned to send their child overseas to
study, have postponed those plans.
In the reimagined university, international deans and recruiters have established
new international student pipelines to replace Chinese international mobility
changes.

Financial Impact of COVID-19
This week Harvard University reported a $10 million deficit as a result of COVID-19.
Canadian universities could lose as much as CAS 3-4 billion as a result of COVID-19.

Smile Section
Like many of you reading this bulletin, my COVID-19 life has given me time to
pursue personal and professional interests. I like to learn new words. So this week
I learned three new words I want to share with you:
Inculcate – instill an attitude or idea by persistent instruction
Fugleman – spokesperson
Veridical – truthful
So I hope I have inculcated through my weekly bulletins the need for a
reimagined university. And I have tried over the past seven months, since I began
writing the bulletins, to be a veridical fugleman for the reimagined university.
Finally, did you know that October 21 st was international pronouns day?