MMAGINATION AND INNOVATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION  

Marguerite Dennis

IMMAGINATION AND INNOVATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION                   2021

INFORMATION FOR TRUSTEES, PRESIDENTS, VICE-CHANCELLORS, PROVOSTS, ACADEMIC DEANS, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICERS, DIRECTORS OF HEALTH AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, ENROLLMENT MANAGERS, INTERNATIONAL DEANS AND RECRUITERS, FINANCIAL AID OFFICERS, CAREER COUNSELORS, LIFELONG LEARNING COUNSELORS, REGISTRARS, ALTERNATIVE EDUCATIONAL PROVIDERS, EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANTS, AND AGENTS

BULLETIN # 37    (JANUARY 18-22, 2021)

by MARGUERITE J. DENNIS

CHINA AND THE NEW WORLD ORDER

My impression is that the day is not very far distant when they will make the most rapid strides toward modern civilization and become dangerous rivals to all powers interested in the trade of the East.

President Ulysses S. Grant, on visiting Shanghai in 1879

In his 2017 book, A World in Disarray, Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations, wrote that emerging international trends suggest a geopolitical competition among the major powers.

Disruption on the world stage.

In 2018 I published, International Student Mobility and the New World Disorder and explained how political and economic disruptions on the world stage would eventually filter down, and impact, higher education.

There can be little doubt that political, economic, and education trends in China have disrupted the world and higher education.

In this week’s bulletin I will focus on some of the economic changes in China and their impact in the world. In next week’s bulletin I will share with you some of the changes in Chinese higher education.

Both bulletins call upon higher education administrators, deans, and recruiters to reimagine their relationship with China and how, going forward they will bring innovation to that relationship.

Shi shi giu shi, loosely translates as seek the truth from facts.

So here are some important Chinese economic facts.

Addressing a closed door session of Chinese leaders in October 2020, Chinese premier Xi-Jinping outlined his vision for China for the next 30 years. His new five-year plan focused on economic self-sufficiency, technological independence, and overtaking the United States as the world’s leading economy.

China has surpassed the United States in gross domestic product based on purchasing power parity.

In the third quarter of 2020, China’s economy grew 4.9 percent, the only country to grow its economy despite the pandemic.

China’s industrial output expanded for eight straight months in 2020.

Industrial production rose seven percent in November 2020 and retail sales expanded 5 percent.

Fixed asset investment grew 2.6 percent in the first 11 months of 2020.

China’s economy was 4.9 percent larger in July 2020 than it was during the same period in 2019.

China’s share of global trade increased nearly 17 percent in 2020.

China minted 36 new billionaires in the first seven months of 2020.

China is on track to do what no other country was able to do in 2020: grow its economy.

In November 2020, China signed the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership agreement with 15 countries in the region, creating a vast free trade framework. Countries in the agreement include: Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

China is the top trading partner of every East Asian country.

In December 2020, 27 EU countries reached an investment agreement with China.

In 2020, of the 20 largest information technology companies, nine are Chinese.

Is the ground sloping east toward a Chinese century?

China’s rise is ushering in a changing world order, with Beijing at the center.

Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates

What do all these facts and figures have to do with imagination and innovation in higher education, in the reimagined university? For decades many colleges and universities relied on Chinese student enrollment to increase both enrollment and revenue. As you will read next week, that is no longer the case. China is already a major importer of international students. Chinese higher education successes has been fueled, in part, by economic growth even during the time of COVID-19.

In the reimagined university, a member of the vision committee is a researcher who should share with the committee how to reimagine your school’s relationship with China.

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