THE IMPACT AND THE OPPORTUNITIES OF COVID-19 ON HIGHER EDUCATION

Marguerite DennisTHE IMPACT AND THE OPPORTUNITIES OF COVID-19 ON HIGHER EDUCATION

INFORMATION FOR PRESIDENTS, VICE-CHANCELLORS, PROVOSTS, ACADEMIC
DEANS, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICERS, CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICERS, DIRECTORS
OF HEALTH AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, ENROLLMENT MANAGERS,
INTERNATIONAL DEANS AND RECRUITERS, REGISTRARS, FINANCIAL AID
OFFICERS, CAREER COUNSELORS, LIFELONG LEARNING COUNSELORS,
ALTERNATIVE EDUCATIONAL PROVIDERS, EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANTS AND
AGENTS

BULLETIN # 31 NOVEMBER 2-6, 2020

Author’s Note: I am pleased to report that on 31 October, my article, “Learning
should be lifelong, not end at graduation,” was published by University World
News. In the article I outline the need for lifelong learning and I give examples of
lifelong learning in the reimagined university.
You may read the full article on the University World News website.

Lifelong learning – Examples
Singapore’s Nanyang Polytechnic is partnering with industry players by
introducing a new Professional Competency Model for students in business
intelligence and analytics. The curriculum is structured around workforce
competencies rather than a subject-based approach to learning.
Technologico de Monterey is redesigning its mission and curriculum to develop
students as entrepreneurial and socially minded leaders who can adapt to the
future, stressing flexibility, leadership skills, and societal values.

Swinburne University in Australia, beginning next year, will offer an associate
degree in cloud technologies. The two-year degree has been developed with
Amazon Web Services and the program allows students to work while studying.

Economic Impact of Covid-19
According to a report issued by the Fortune Global Forum, the global economy is
in for a long and painful recovery.
Carmen Reinhart, speaking at the forum said, There’s a difference between a
near-term masking of the problem and there not being a problem.
According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization report, international
tourist arrivals in the United States declined 70% in the first eight months of 2020.
There were 700 million fewer international arrivals and a loss of $730 billion in
tourism revenues.

The Pennsylvania State University System will lay off more than 100 faculty
members. In future bulletins I will share with you research and insights on the
changes brought about by COVID-19 to faculty teaching and administrative duties.
As state budgets shrink, and many private school enrollments decline, fewer
adjust faculty may be retained or hired to teach.

United States – Updates and Enrollment Statistics
According to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, undergraduate
enrollment in the United States declined 4% over the same time last year.
Community college enrollment declined 9.4% and students moving from two-year
to four-year schools declined 4.7.
According to a report issued by World Education News and Reviews, 40% of
prospective international students surveyed in August 2020 were less interested
in studying in the United States. In June 2020, the percentage was 5%.
Preliminary estimates show a decrease of nearly 14% for undergraduate
international student enrollment in the United States last year and nearly an 8%

decline for graduate international students. Increasingly, international students
are interested in studying in Canada, Australia, and the UK.
According to a Nikkei Asia report, the United States issued 99% fewer F-1 student
visas from China this year. Student visa declines also increased to students from
India, South Korea, Mexico, Japan, and the Netherlands.
In a short while the Institute for International Education will produce its annual
international enrollment statistics and I will report that information as soon as it is
available.

Political Prediction
I don’t usually do this but at 10:51 am I am, like many of you, awaiting the results
of the presidential election. If Joseph R. Biden becomes the next president, I
expect that some of the draconian higher education measures introduced over
the past four years will be reversed and both domestic and international outreach
and enrollment will increase in the United States.

But the outreach and the enrollment should be reimagined.

This week’s word
Quaesitum – the answer to a problem.
Past centuries have shown that governments can and will do the right thing but
only after they have no other choice.
Johannes Urpelainen, Prince Sultan bin Abdulaziz, Professor of Energy, Resources
and Environment at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies
How many colleges and universities worldwide will do the right thing by
reimagining their schools, re-designing their curricula, planning for uncertainty
with imagination and flexibility and pushing boundaries with good scenario
planning?